Five (Almost) Deserted Beaches You Haven ‘t Been To Yet

As I post this deep in the grip of a bitter mid-Atlantic February, I’m dreaming of finding myself somewhere warm and sunny.  I’ve gathered a selection of five (plus one!) off-the-radar gems that will bring some inspiration for your next oceanside getaway.  You won’t find any swim-up bars or cabana boys here, but if uninterrupted peace and quiet are what you’re looking for, you can’t go wrong.  Check out these hidden beaches that, with a little planning and a bit of luck, you can have all to yourself:

1. Anakena Beach, Easter Island, Chile – A visit to the second-most remote inhabited island in the world yields this crescent beach of powdery sand and the disconcerting figures of stone moai (statues) adorning their ahu (platform). Go on a weekday and find yourself alone with the spirits of the Rapa Nui ancestors.

Enjoy ancient culture and a dose of relaxation at the same time.

Enjoy ancient culture and a dose of relaxation at the same time.

2. Isla Rabida, Galapagos, Ecuador – A cruise of the Galapagos Islands wouldn’t be complete without a stopover on the red sand beach of Isla Rabida, where you can relax with the native birds and sea lions that make the islands their home.

You may end up sharing this beach with some lazy sea mammals.  (photo courtesy of Dwight Ridenour.)

You may end up sharing this beach with some lazy sea mammals.
(photo courtesy of Dwight Ridenour.)

3. Palm Beach, Swakopmund, Namibia – Not a particularly scenic beach as it is just outside the town center of Swakopmund, but since Namibia is one of the least densely populated countries in the world there’s a good chance you won’t be fighting any crowds. Pair it with a visit to the Kristal Gallerie to see geology at its finest.

This beach in the town of Swakopmund is frequently inhabited by seagulls . . . and not much else.

This beach in the town of Swakopmund is frequently inhabited by seagulls . . . and not much else.

4. Gibb’s Cay, Turks and Caicos – It takes a puddle-jumper followed by a water taxi to reach this tiny uninhabited spit of sand in the Turks & Caicos islands, but if you book with the right tour company you’ll soon find yourself in the company of a school of gentle and ghostly stingrays who come to swim with the few tourists who venture out here. Try to work in some extra time for a nap on the beach.

Make some new friends under the water, followed by a picnic alone with your thoughts. (photo courtesy of Dwight Ridenour)

Make some new friends under the water, followed by a picnic alone with your thoughts.
(photo courtesy of Dwight Ridenour)

5. Kaihalulu Beach, Maui, United States – It takes a bit of bravery and a bit of athleticism to climb the treacherous cliff trail to this hidden red sand beach, but once there you’ll be rewarded with ultimate freedom – the cove shelters Maui’s only nude beach from prying eyes.

Follow proper etiquette -- no close-up photos! (photo courtesy of Dwight Ridenour)

Follow proper etiquette — no close-up photos!
(photo courtesy of Dwight Ridenour)

BONUS: Sunj Beach, Lopud Island, Croatia – One of the Elaphiti Islands clustered in the Adriatic just off of Dubrovnik, this island does attract tourists in the high season but enjoys a mere 220 year-round residents. Take a kayak tour around the island or a hike up to the overlook where you can have views of Lopud Beach on the other side.

Discovered by a few yachts and day-trippers, this tiny island is nonetheless still a quiet gem.

Discovered by a few yachts and day-trippers, this tiny island is nonetheless still a quiet gem.

 

 

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4 thoughts on “Five (Almost) Deserted Beaches You Haven ‘t Been To Yet

  1. Funny you should say, but I’ve actually visited Gibb’s Cay. We had a great day out there. There’s nothing like finding the beach in the middle of no where.

    Like

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